Naughty kids are more likely to have financial problems in middle age

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Mean kids who have temper tantrums are more likely to have financial problems in middle age, study finds

  • Researchers looked at data from 1,000 New Zealanders born in 1972 and 1973
  • Follow-up of their life through surveys, interviews and examinations until the age of 45
  • Lack of self-control revealed in childhood correlates with implications later in life










Annoying children who have an angry temper and regular temper tantrums are likely to have problems when they grow into middle-aged adults, a new study finds.

More than 1,000 New Zealanders born in 1972 and 1973 were followed throughout their lives until the age of 45.

Analysis of the data revealed that people with greater self-control as children were more able to properly manage their finances.

Inconvenient children who have an angry temper and regular temper tantrums are likely to have problems when they grow into middle-aged adults, new study finds (stock image)

According to the study, people who demonstrated great self-control in childhood also age physically more slowly.

Those with greater self-control also exhibited fewer signs of brain aging and managed their health, finances and social life better.

The study also found that adults who were impulsive kids who then improved their self-control are healthier than people who never get their short strands under control.

Dr. Leah Richmond-Rakerd of the University of Michigan led the study published today in PNAS.

According to the study, people who demonstrated great self-control in childhood also age physically more slowly.  Those with greater self-control also showed fewer signs of brain aging and better managed their health, finances and social life (stock image)

According to the study, people who demonstrated great self-control in childhood also age physically more slowly. Those with greater self-control also showed fewer signs of brain aging and better managed their health, finances and social life (stock image)

‘We measured [participants’] rhythm of aging and preparation for midlife aging using measurements derived from biological and physiological assessments, structural brain imaging scans, observer assessments, self-assessments, reports of informants and administrative files, ”writes the team.

“In adulthood, children with better self-control aged more slowly in their bodies and showed fewer signs of aging in their brains.

“In their 40s, these children were also better equipped to handle a range of health, financial and social demands later in life.”

When children with better self-control became middle-aged, they had more practical financial literacy; were more far-sighted financially; and had better credit scores than toddlers prone to temper tantrums, they add.

Researchers believe that a deliberate effort to increase self-control in young people could prolong both the length and the quality of their lives.

A smart mattress tracks the body temperature of newborns

Smart gadgets are everywhere, with tech companies putting artificial intelligence into cars, speakers, light bulbs and phones.

Their purpose, in general, is to make life more connected and a little easier, but they are also used in the medical field to improve the quality of patient care.

Experts from Nottingham Trent University have teamed up with Chesterfield maker Rober Ltd to make smart mattresses for premature babies to keep them at the perfect temperature to avoid health complications.

Premature babies are often unable to maintain their core body temperature and must be kept warm at all times.

Otherwise, it can lead to health issues like metabolic issues and difficulty breathing.

The developers of the new bed say it can detect tiny fluctuations in temperature and instantly heat up to keep the baby from getting cold.

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